Mistah FAB Birthday Celebration

MLK Day + Inauguration Day 2013

Mistah FAB Birthday Celebration

Hosted By Talib Kweli w/ A Guest DJ Set, Souls Of Mischief, DJ D Sharp, Special Guest Performances

Monday 1/21

10:00 pm

The New Parish

Oakland, CA

$15.00 - $20.00

This event is 21 and over

Mistah FAB Birthday Celebration
Mistah FAB Birthday Celebration
One of the most prominent and colorful figures of the San Francisco Bay Area hyphy movement in the late 2000s -- sometimes hailed as the scene's "crown prince" -- North Oakland-based rapper Mistah F.A.B. presents a somewhat exceptional combination of street credibility, social consciousness, astute introspection, and irrepressible goofiness. Born Stanley P. Cox in 1982 and raised by his mother and grandmother, he stresses the positivity of hyphy's party-happy, irreverent, but inspirational "go dumb" mentality and manifests a dedication to inner-city social issues, which doesn't mean he's immune to a certain amount of mainstream rap's flamboyant materialism: his handle is supposedly an acronym for "Money Is Something to Always Have -- FaEva After Bread." F.A.B., who also goes by Fabby Davis, Jr., titled his second album Son of a Pimp in bluntly literal reference to his pimp father, who was incarcerated for much of F.A.B.'s childhood and died of AIDS-related complications when his son was 12, around the time he started writing rhymes. That album, F.A.B.'s first for hyphy forerunner Mac Dre's Thizz label (following his 2003 debut, Nig-Latin), featured collaborations with many noted Bay Area rappers including Dre, E-40, Turf Talk, and G-Stack of Oakland heroes the Delinquents -- as well as Kanye West -- and boasted one of the biggest hits of the resurgent hyphy scene, "Super Sic wit' It."
A slew of mixtapes, compilations, and guest spots made him ubiquitous in the local scene throughout 2005 and 2006, and led him to host his own locally oriented show, Yellow Bus Radio, on KYLD-FM, which -- in keeping with hyphy's special-ed scholastic motif -- featured weekly book reports. With burgeoning national interest in Bay Area hip-hop in 2006, F.A.B. became the subject of a major-label bidding war, signing with Atlantic Records that September, but a series of obstacles hindered his career momentum. KMEL-FM, the Bay's top urban station, imposed an unofficial but crippling blacklist of F.A.B.'s songs and guest appearances, due to petty personal grievances as well as the perceived slight of his successful show on a rival station, thereby significantly undermining his hometown visibility. Later, his breakout single, "Ghost Ride It," was the subject of controversy on two fronts -- national clamor over the hyphy practice of "ghost riding" described in the song (throwing a car in neutral, then jumping out and walking alongside or riding on the roof as it continues to move), following two fatal, allegedly related incidents, and threatened legal action from Columbia Pictures over the use of the Ghostbusters logo in the video (the track samples the movie's theme song) -- which caused the video to be first heavily censored and then pulled from television altogether.

Da Yellow Bus Rydah, F.A.B.'s debut for Atlantic, originally scheduled for spring of 2007, was delayed by over two years (and most recently slated for a 2009 release under the revised title The Bus Ride). However, thanks to an unusually liberal contract, he was able to keep busy with work on independent labels, instead releasing another Thizz full-length, Da Baydestrian, in May 2007, and continuing his steady stream of mixtapes and album-length collaborations with G-Stack, Turf Talk, the Alchemist, and Glasses Malone through 2009 (including Hyphy Ain't Dead, a collaboration with Turf Talk).
Hosted By Talib Kweli w/ A Guest DJ Set
Hosted By Talib Kweli w/ A Guest DJ Set
The Brooklyn-based rapper earned his stripes as one of the most lyrically-gifted, socially aware and politically insightful rappers to emerge in the last 20 years. His travels around the globe as one of rap's most in-demand performers combined with his conversations with political activists and his genre-straddling work with Idle Warship and others caused Kweli to realize that he was limited in a sense, a prisoner of sorts of his own success as one of the world's best rappers with something significant to say.

"My music has been associated with those types of causes, with positivity, spirituality, intelligence and being thought-provoking and such," he says. "I think sometimes people get caught up in that part of me as an artist and don't necessarily understand the musicality or fully appreciate the music and the entertainment value behind what I do. I tried to stretch my wings a little bit and bring something that was less beholden to the world of hip-hop and more existing in the world in general."

The result of this artistic growth and exploration arrives with Kweli's dynamic Prisoner Of Conscious AKA P.O.C., an artistic tour de force that signals the start of the next chapter of Kweli's remarkable career. The BK MC spent more time working on Prisoner Of Conscious than any of his other albums, a three-year journey that found him exploring new vibes, joining in some unlikely collaborations and taking him to foreign lands.

Produced by Symbolyc One (Kanye West, Ghostface), the title track's alternatively rap and rock-based beat provides a distinctive platform for Kweli to deliver rhymes that detail his artistic awakening, while producers Sean C & LV (Jay-Z, Raekwon) created a Marvin Gaye-esque vibe for "Come," a cut featuring Miguel that showcases Kweli trying to convince a series of women to do things his way.

Then there's the dramatic, piano-driven "Before He Walked," which showcases passionate vocals from singer Abby Dobson and includes a verse from possibly the most noteworthy guest on Prisoner Of Conscious: Nelly. Both Kweli and The St. Louis rapper recount the importance music has had in their lives on the stirring song, which was an outgrowth of conversations about music and life Kweli and Nelly had at Kweli's Los Angeles residence.

"Nelly is somebody I've known and have been friendly with throughout the years in this business," Kweli says. "Nelly has always been an example for me because a rising tide raises all boats. Nelly is an artist who is polarizing at times because of the 'Tip Drill' video to the boycotts he's endured at colleges, but I know him as a person, and he's a great person."

Elsewhere, the driving "Ready Set Go" with singer Melanie Fiona features Kweli's ever-impressive clever verbal gymnastics, which are also on display on the stark Busta Rhymes-guested and RZA-produced "Rocketships."

Kweli shifts gears on "Favela Love." Inspired by and created during a trip to Sao Paulo, Brazil, the breezy song features crooning from Brazilian singer and actor Seu George (City Of God, The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou). Kweli and George met in the studio, leading Kweli to deviate from his original concept for the song.

"The song went from being about a woman to be being about Brazil, about the favela, about loving to come there," he reveals. "The woman is really a metaphor for the place. That's why it's called 'Favela Love.' When I was telling Seu George about that, he started singing about how much he loves Brazil and where Brazil fits in the world."
After nearly 20 years of releasing mesmerizing music, Talib Kweli stands as one of the world's most talented and most accomplished rappers.

Whether working with Mos Def as one-half of Black Star, partnering with producer Hi-Tek for Reflection Eternal, releasing landmark solo material or collaborating with Kanye West or Madlib, Kweli commands attention by delivering top-tier lyricism, crafting captivating stories and showing the ability to rhyme over virtually any type of beat.

In particular, Kweli showed his artistic reach in Idle Warship. Teaming with longtime collaborator and acclaimed singer Res, Kweli began getting out of his sonic and creative comfort zone on the group's 2009 mixtape Party Robot and its debut album, 2011's Habits Of The Heart.

Idle Warship's music challenged Kweli and led him to a new artistic space. "I like the position I'm in," he says. "I feel like I'm a connector, a leader. I feel like I've led by example and I want to continue to do that. I like the fact that I'm in a position where cats who are coming out and making music that I enjoy are interested in my music and are interested in my influence. It's a great feeling."

Kweli also has the high-powered Attack The Block mixtape with DJ Z-Trip set to arrive and will be focusing on making his Javotti Media (which released his 2011 album, Gutter Rainbows, and is named after his paternal grandmother) into a media powerhouse that releases music, films and books.

But for now, Prisoner Of Conscious arrives as an artistic triumph, a collection that embodies Talib Kweli's robust creative vision. "I wanted to put out an album that really can support the artist that I've become," he says. "I'm a touring artist. I'm an artist that's internationally known. I'm not just a local artist at this point in my career. I'm cognizant of the fact that what I do is beyond where it started. I'm trying to reach the apex of where I am now, but without turning my back on or dismissing what I've done before."
Souls Of Mischief
Souls Of Mischief
From the bowels of the bustling metropolis of Oakland, California, four artists emerge with the determination, skill and pure talent to change the face of Hip Hop. The four combine to form Souls of Mischief; a feisty band of microphone marauders and beat plunderers.
The Souls of Mischief have been honing their skills for nearly two decades in the Oakland area. They all hail from the same area in East Oakland and have attended school together since elementary; their lasting friendship strengthened by their mutual interest in music. Battling hosts of MC's from far and near, and gaining fame as stunning lyricists, these four young men; A-plus, Opio, Phesto and Tajai, along with their musical family, Hieroglyphics, have worked at their craft until it has become like a sharp-edged sword, cutting through boundaries of sound and style. "We started out trying to be definitely different, and most definitely better than the stuff that's out there" remarks the energetic, mad scientist-like Phesto.
Looking at their track record, the Souls have achieved these goals and are continuing down their path of excellence. Their first LP, 93 'Til Infinity (Jive, 1993) debuted at #14 on Billboard's R&B charts, placing at 109 in the top 200. Their second album, No Man's Land (Jive, 1995) came in at #27 on the R&B charts. Although both albums were received well by the Hip Hop community, neither achieved the type of success enjoyed by more mainstream acts. "We just want to make good music" says Tajai, "sales are important, but we aren't going to compromise our music's quality to sell." This attitude is central to the Souls' unique style and appeal.
Atypical of what has been dubbed the "West Coast Sound," the Souls' music, lyrical structure and content challenge the listener to actually LISTEN to what is being said and pay attention to the subtle nuances of beat and scratch which accent their lyrics. According to the smooth-flowing A-plus, "We're trying to present a broad spectrum and redefine what it is to be West Coast, and more importantly- Hip Hop in it's entirety." Straying from empty gangsterisms and other forms of negativity, these brothers try to constantly add to the quality and depth of Hip Hop. This is a very precarious position in a world where artists of a positive nature rarely reach critical acclaim, yet the Souls embrace the challenge. As a result, their work has been embraced by the Hip Hop community all over the globe. They have been billed with the best and brightest of the industry, including tours with A Tribe Called Quest, De La Soul, Common Sense, The Alkaholiks, Pharcyde, The Roots, KRS-ONE, Wu-Tang Clan and others. They also brought their Hieroglyphic show, which includes Del the Funky Homosapien, Casual and the Prose to fans throughout the United States, Canada and Japan. This worldwide exposure has made their style one of the most loved and reproduced in Rap.


The Souls' lyrics and production can currently be heard on the Hieroglyphics debut LP, Third Eye Vision (Hiero Imperium, 1998) available through their own Hiero Imperium label. This project represents a new direction for the Souls, as they are able to team up with their Hieroglyphic brethren (Casual, Del, The Prose, Domino) and create more energetic rhythms and styles. As the first release on their own independent label, Third Eye Vision has enabled the Souls to have complete creative and marketing control over their own material. The Souls also have an independent album in circulation entitled Focus (Hiero Imperium, 1998) which has been making a lot of noise on the underground since its release in early 1998. At present, the group has just released a new album: Trilogy: Conflict, Climax, Resolution (Hiero Imperium, 2000) and is collaboratiing with the Pharcyde on a project tentatively titled Almyghty Myghty Python.
So what is it to be a "Soul of Mischief?" The name seems to imply a much darker, more nefarious group of characters than those described. "We make mischief on the microphone--we came to wreak havoc on the mic," Opio chimes in. It seems that somewhere in their essence, at the base of their psyche, there is a nagging voice which keeps telling these young men to break the standards. By taking lyricism into realms uncharted, and even into some areas which would be better left alone, they express this mischievous soul and break ground in the Hip Hop industry. Their courage and determination to challenge the status quo of rap make them innovators in this field of imitators.
DJ D Sharp
DJ D Sharp
A skilled entertainer and triple threat, D Sharp can produce, DJ and rock his own mic. His passion for music coupled with diligence, has gained him attention from industry professionals, and to move with the best of the best. Whether touring the world with acclaimed artists, producing albums and orchestrating mixtapes, or DJing for hungry party-goers, his love for music shines through all his projects and has awarded him success on all fronts.

D Sharp is based in the San Francisco Bay Area, but his music has echoed across the world. As a DJ, he has toured with the likes of Jay Z, Kanye West, Outkast, Common, Busta Rhymes, Snoop Dogg, The Game, Pharrell, Wu Tang Clan, and Jurassic 5. He started DJing professionally at the ambitious age of 15 and kept focused through the late 90’s having played in almost every venue in the Bay Area. In ’99 he connected with an old friend, Lateef Daumont, with Quannum Projects, who brought D Sharp’s awaiting talent into the spotlight, and since he has DJed for almost every Quannum act, including Blackalicious, Gift of Gab, Lifesavas, Latyrx and Lyrics Born. His experience with Quannum Projects allowed him to tour the world and become the primary tour DJ for Lauryn Hill, Clyde Carson, Mike Patton (Peeping Tom), Planet Asia, and Goapele. He also played as an integral member of the group Flipsyde. Flipsyde, is a Bay Area based group, whom came together in 2003 and shortly after released their major-label debut, “We the People,” which received positive reviews. To add kudos, Flipsyde’s first single, “Someday,” was chosen as NBC’s theme song for the 2006 Winter Olympics. The Band has appeared on Jay Leno, Conan O’Brien and The Soul Train as well as toured with the Black Eyed Peas and the Pussycat Dolls.

As a producer, D Sharp’s trained ear and experience lends invaluable insight. His latest stint is collaborating with Bay Area artists Mr. Town, Tony Vic, and Nerve, all honing their unique style, testifying D sharp can morph and support different project needs. He has also worked on mixtapes with singer, Jennifer Johns and Grammy nominated MC Lateef the Truth Speaker with Quannum Projects.

As a club DJ, his roots lay heavy in the Bay Area, from San Jose to San Francisco, he is constantly on the grind and a staple in the music and club scene. He is liked by club owners, promoters, artists and club-goers alike. Fellas get with him because of his hard-hitting, seamless mixes and the ladies take a liking to his personable style that literally spills out onto the dance floor. He’s an entertainer and championed dance floors night after night, venue after venue, including Las Vegas, NY and LA.
Venue Information:
The New Parish
579 18th St
Oakland, CA, 94612
http://www.thenewparish.com/