Wintersleep

Wintersleep

Elliott Brood

Sunday 11/18

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 7:30 pm

The New Parish

Oakland, CA

$10.00 - $12.00

Tickets Available at the Door

This event is 18 and over

Wintersleep
Wintersleep
Ten years ago, the members of Wintersleep began working on songs in a small apartment in Halifax, NS. This is the second most notable thing about this particularly drab apartment complex next to the fact that, due to an oversight by the architect, if the pool on the roof was ever filled – the building would tip over. The songs they created were strange, full of rural ghosts and forgotten landscapes.
A decade later, Wintersleep – who can now be referred to as 'Juno Award winners' in promotional documents such as this -­‐ have brought their distinctive
sound to audiences across many territories and continents. The band's latest trek was in support of 2010's New Inheritors, an album that the Wall Street Journal claims, "broods, bellows and stalks the listener with soaring vocals, punching drums and waves of guitars." It saw them perform across North America, the UK, Ireland, continental Europe, and ended under the receptive lights of The Late Show with David Letterman.
It was during this time that an abundance of ideas & new material began taking shape, via late night voice memo'd bedroom demos, hallucinogenic dreams of Paul Schaeffer, and sound check experiments recorded while touring with acts such as Wolf Parade, The Hold Steady, The Macabees & Editors.
Late in the summer of 2011, the group fleshed out these new ideas with Scottish producer/friend Tony Doogan (Belle & Sebastian, Mogwai) and Dave Fridmann (Flaming Lips, Mercury Rev, MGMT) at the legendary Tarbox Road Studios in upstate New York. Secluded in the same woods that had already seen the creation of so much amazing work, the group committed themselves to long, focused recording sessions...and the occasional badminton match. Doogan can crush a bird. Who knew?
"Hello hum. I am the dying lung of the town you left. I was beginning to fear, beginning to fear that you would never come back."
These words open the album's first track, "Hum." The song sits like a layer of mist that the speeding car of "In Came the Flood" comes bursting through. It's a two-­‐part introduction to the diverse layers of Hello Hum. As the record progresses, glowing melodies are backed by rhythms that can stand as the skeletons of songs or be studied for their subtle complexities. Guitars and keyboards weave together in fits of sonic weirdness that somehow shine with pop charm.
Is it a high-­‐water mark? A divergent progression? Maybe it's just ten years worn well. Loel Campbell, Paul Murphy & Tim D'Eon have spent a decade collecting. Hello Hum starts a new chapter.
Elliott Brood
Elliott Brood
Elliott BROOD have always been time travellers. The Toronto trio writes songs steeped in history that feel very present. They've done their share of actual travelling, too, these musical troubadours, acoustic guitars and banjos slung over their sharp suits as they barnstormed across Canada and beyond. For the new album Days Into Years it was century-old stories encountered an ocean away that brought them closest to home.

On the band's first European tour back in 2007 they found themselves driving through the backroads of France. Vocalist Mark Sasso, guitarist Casey Laforet and drummer Stephen Pitkin, all enthusiasts of military history, raised on the harrowing stories of Canadians in World War 1, were simply looking to avoid the toll highways. Then they came upon a sign for a WW1 military cemetery.

"We'd been driving through Belgium and France, always passing by these historical war places and we decided to pull over and take this one in," recalls Mark. "We saw all these Canadian names, and it really resonated with us, these young guys that had gone off to war. I knew all about it from reading books, but when you actually visit a place where the battles were, it hits you a lot harder. We said, 'We need to write a record about it.'"
Days Into Years is Elliott BROOD's third full-length recording, the follow-up to 2008's Polaris Prize short-listed Mountain Meadows. Like its predecessors, including the 2004 debut EP Tin Type and 2006's Juno-nominated Ambassador, it mines real history to connect songs that are deeply personal in a cinematic, narrative way. Unfolding like a series of movie scenes, it looks to the future by starting with the past. Opening track "Lindsay" invites you into process of revisiting one's life while cleaning out an old family home. "If I Get Old" daydreams of making it through difficult times, be they in the trenches or a sickbed, and finding a nice place in the country to live out one's final moments. Days Into Years presents these reflections as a celebration of life, particularly on the perfect summer single "Northern Air," a love letter both to the rural Ontario landscape and the memory of a departed friend whose spirit now resides there.
Venue Information:
The New Parish
579 18th St
Oakland, CA, 94612
http://www.thenewparish.com/